Category Archives: Technology

Transparent Data Streams

I’ve been wrestling with transparency lately – mostly around the consumer side of things.  Transparency is great, but if it comes at the cost of too data overload, then is it really worth it?

One of my blog readers reached out and said he’d started a service called VoyURL of which I’ve been participating with for the past 24-36 hours or so.  It’s interesting – right now as a novelty, but once I can use all of the data to extract meaning, it could have implications.  I’m not quite sure what they are yet.

I’ve pulled some initial reports of the entire VoyURL universe and my own.  It’s fun for me to see how my web consumption differs from the VoyURL universe.

It’s like Blippy for browsing data.

VoyURL Data

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Experience Platforms Powered by Technology

Read my previous post for a good preface to this one as it’ll help with the understanding.

The 80/20 rule for products are that 20% of the product users will be vocal and you won’t here from the other 80%.  Sometimes, this is more like 95/5.

I’m going to liberally stretch this to be 80% of the owners of products don’t really care how they are built but want the product benefits.  20% of the product owners are the passionistas and want to know everything about them.

Example:  Porsche just launched the Panamera 4S Hybrid.  The Porsche forums (on line) are having serious chatter around this car – both the good and bad, but the majority of people will never see this chatter nor really care about it.  80% of Porsche buyers (maybe more) don’t care how the engine works or which hybrid system it employs, they want to drive the car from point A to B and have a great experience doing it.

This is very important for the world of digital media and technology, especially if you are building consumer applications.  Let me explain.

As more and more people come access the Internet across the world, the digital passionistas who care about every technological nuance become less and less (diluted by the growth of the Internet).  As this happens, the experience of the application of the technology needs to be more powerful than the actual technology itself.  Again, please reference yesterday’s post for more on this.

Clay Shirky says it very well:  Once the technology have sunk deep enough in the culture, the social effects built upon the technology require the technology but aren’t about the technology

One of the questions I ponder which is relevant to this is that IF the web is less and less about the technology and more about experiences, then how sustainable is any one experience when humans are naturally curious and are always on the lookout for additional experiences.  Should companies on the web craft multiple experiences for consumers under different brands and connect them together?  Think of the assets AOL has, this could be interesting.  It’s not just about any one brand any more.

Another example:  I like to vacation with my family.  While we were in Aruba a year or two ago, we had an amazing time.  Have we been back?  Nope.  We’ve picked other countries and states to visit because the world is so vast and we want to experience so much of it.

Back in December 2010, I wrote a post entitled, I Don’t Want to be Monogomous.  The post talked about how I’d like to experience other phones and access devices but I’m locked into one mobile contract for one particular phone (iPhone 4).  These types of experiences are extremely limited and might do more harm than good to consumers in the long run.

To get back to the general thesis of this post, we’re seeing big bets made recently in what I like to call “experience platforms powered by technology.”  It’s not the technology itself that’s special, but rather the experiences that are built on top of the technology.  I explain the Twitter ecosystem here and why it’s special.  Facebook is fascinating too.  Quora – unless it opens up to be a platform that provides value creation for more than one business entity, it’s not that fascinating as a platform.

In a world where digital is going to penetrate most of our media vehicles, crafting the user interface and experience (overall presentation layer) is going to be of utmost importance.  Differentiating on features isn’t going to win, but differentiating on the experience that these features deliver is going to create lasting power with consumers.  At kbs+p Ventures, this is one of our major thesis and we are on the look out of awesome innovators in this area.

This post is all over the place, apologies for the rambling!

Technology as an Enabler

I was watching [on Fora.tv] a 2008 Clay Shirky talk he gave to a bunch of folks at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard and he hit the nail over the head around a topic that I like to talk about, “technology as an enabler.”

One of my best friends, Andrew Sispoidis, one of the co-founders of IGA Worldwide, and funnily enough also remotely looks like Clay, once told me that technology should purely be an enabler.  Anytime you dive down deep into technology and promote the “technology” component, it’s a zero sum game as it becomes a feature war with your closest competitors.

In the video I watched today, Clay adds to the technology as enabler thought:

Once the technology have sunk deep enough in the culture, the social effects built upon the technology require the technology but aren’t about the technology

I like this a lot as it sums it up nicely.  Think about it this way:  when you have a great car trip, it’s probably because you listened to some great music or had fantastic conversation.  Very rarely do you say that the Brembo brakes worked flawlessly and the engine’s torque made the ride smooth.

Social effects become interesting when technology becomes boring.

I really like this topic.

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PointCast & UberMedia

Bill, we’ve never met but I’ve been a big fan of yours since the idealab! days.  I’d love to chat with you based on your recent media coverage around UberMedia.

I’ve been reading lots of the recent news around the acquisition of TweetDeck and your other acquisitions..  This morning, I read an interview on PaidContent which really crystalized this for me and appropriately, Chris Dixon named you a badass swashbuckler.

I don’t have such a cool name for you, but I do want to share a few things with you that I’ve been writing now for the past 5 years.  Note, this is not everything, but snippets of what I could find indexed in Google from my blog.

Here’s a snippet of what was written on PaidContent this morning:

For some of us, like you, some of these ideas of push news, push information, we’ve been there, we’ve seen them fail. I was involved with PointCast. Here’s what I think has happened. Some ideas are really, really great and fundamental, like the push power of PointCast, which Twitter is very similar to today. However, the time wasn’t right. The devices weren’t ready for it. We didn’t have mobile devices, didn’t have smartphones back when PointCast was out, The bandwidth was too low. One of the big challenges PointCast has was taking over the bandwidth of corporate servers so they blocked it. At that time, the dial-up modem was just too slow to handle the push graphics. Today, it’s ideal. The ideal circumstances are there so sometimes old ideas at the right time are really powerful and I think that’s the case today.

As many of you who have followed this blog since day 1, I’ve said that there is room for PointCast to come back.  I even attempted to purchase PointCast 3 years ago but that failed and that’s when I began building Tomzy in my private time.  Tomzy will be released in the near future once a few developers can finish up the initial alpha code.

Here are a few of my blog posts about PointCast over the years.  The media landscape is so ripe for it especially as all of our media consumption “devices” are becoming connected.

Predictions for 2006 (1/2/2006)  We’re going to see a “Pointcast” type network emerge for media.  For those who do not know what PointCast was, it was a startup formed in 1992 that provided relevant news and information to your desktop thru a push application.  See the Wikipedia definition here.  Pointcast didn’t fail due to it’s amazing product- it failed due to poor management and the timing of the marketplace.  I’d like to see Pointcast come back in some iteration that may bridge iTV, iRadio, Internet, and video games.  Do I believe that media can be 100% ad-supported?  Not all of the media, but there are certainly a mass quantity of media that can be – so lets get Pointcast up and running and support that relevant media.  (I’ve got an idea, so contact me)

PointCast & Widgets (8/29/2006):  Are we going to see a resurgence of the PointCast Network?

The Adobe Air Up There (9/27/2007):  Lots of possibilities for this platform. The number one possibility I’d like to see it enable/bring back? PointCast. If PointCast had launched utilizing the Adobe AIR platform, the technical hurdles that the developers faced in the 90s would have went away and PointCast may be the next new network. Who knows. I’d love to place a bet that a similar [PointCast] model will emerge soon utilizing this platform.

Digital Ramblings:  Long Post Warnings (12/7/2008):  Boxee is really interesting for many reasons, but the first of which is getting digital content onto my living room TV.  I can watch everything from Fast Lane Daily to TED Talks, Hulu to Netflix.  Genius.  I want to see Boxee expand to the desktop as well in terms of a content distribution system inside of widgets.  Think PointCast model.  I’d be very interested in talking further about this.

Bill, I welcome a conversation with you next time you are in NYC or I’ll fly out to San Francisco to meet with you.  You can contact me thru this form (sorry for not giving email address due to search engine spammers) and I’ll gladly be in touch.

If you aren’t Bill Gross, but are an entrepreneur who has serious aspirations around a “new” PointCast model and you can think larger than the traditional “desktop” experience, lets chat too.

Happy Saturday.

Darren

3 Interesting TED Videos to Watch

I found a new content consumption occasion in my life and it’s during the time I’m on the elliptical in my home gym.  I rest my iPad against the top of the machine and have been consuming TED videos for the past few weeks.

While in the beginning I searched for specific topics that I thought would be of significant interest to me, in the recent weeks, I have let the app choose and it’s been inspiring.  Occasionally, there is a dud, but most of the time, I’m pleased with what I watch.

Here are three recent videos that I really liked – not all are marketing, technology or advertising related.

We Are All Makers by Dale Dougherty:  America was built by makers — curious, enthusiastic amateur inventors whose tinkering habit sparked whole new industries. At TED@MotorCity, MAKE magazine publisher Dale Dougherty says we’re all makers at heart, and shows cool new tools to tinker with, like Arduinos, affordable 3D printers, even DIY satellites. (taken from TED website)

Are We All Born to Run? by Christopher Mcdougall: Christopher McDougall explores the mysteries of the human desire to run. How did running help early humans survive — and what urges from our ancient ancestors spur us on today? At TEDxPennQuarter, McDougall tells the story of the marathoner with a heart of gold, the unlikely ultra-runner, and the hidden tribe in Mexico that runs to live. (taken from TED website)

Life Lessons from an Ad Man by Rory Sutherland:  Advertising adds value to a product by changing our perception, rather than the product itself. Rory Sutherland makes the daring assertion that a change in perceived value can be just as satisfying as what we consider “real” value — and his conclusion has interesting consequences for how we look at life. (taken from TED website)

I especially find the last one, Life Lessons from an Ad Man inspiring because it hits close to home with what I do everyday and I find Rory an extremely good presenter.

Hope you enjoy.

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My First Ohours Day Competed

For those note familiar with Ohours, it’s my friend Nate‘s new experiment with helping to connect people looking to network and connect with other interesting people.  He also coded it from start to finish as his working education to learning programming.  I thought I’d try it.

I held my first Ohours day on Friday, January 7.  I made an hour of my time available in 20 minute increments and met with three different people.  I had absolutely no idea what to expect going in and was very curious to see who would pick me.

I will leave out the names of the people I met with due to confidentiality purposes but will give some insight into the content of the meetings and my overall opinions:

  • Probably no shock, all three meetings had to do with entrepreneurship and for me to give quick feedback on certain aspects of their business (fundraising, business development, hiring)
  • The meetings underscore to me that the New York tech scene has a lack of development talent which has been written about quite a bit lately or people just do not know where to look (which seems to be less of an issue now)

Here is some advice if you are using Ohours (and feedback for the product in general):

  • 20 minute meetings are tough.  By the time you are done with intro’s, then you have 10 minutes to talk.  Not a ton of time.  I’d say minimum meeting times should be 30 minutes (an extra 10 mins means a lot)
  • Ohours should send an email with brief bio’s of each person you are meeting with.  I actually had only met one of the three people I had met with before and wasn’t able to research their backgrounds before meeting individually with them.  If Ohours could pull from the various sources online (like LinkedIn) with bio information, it would be helpful.
  • A private feedback mechanism would be helpful to see how the participants in the meeting felt about it.  It could be less about “did I like the person” but more about “did the meeting add or enrich value” (or something along those lines)

The next 2 weeks are grueling for me and laden with travel so I’ll have another Ohours in February.  It’s not posted yet on the site but will tweet it out when it eventually is posted.

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Optimizing My Content Consumption

Image representing Summify as depicted in Crun...
Image via CrunchBase

It’s very rare that I have time to web surf and pop onto random websites and consume whatever is there.  24 hours just is not enough for me at this point in my life and so I need the best possible filtering agents to help me consume/optimize my time online.

What I expect from a filtering solution today:

  1. Takes inputs from me and understands what I want from them
  2. Look-a-like model against my input list and expand it
  3. Understand what my social graph is consuming

What I expect from a filtering solution tomorrow:

All of the above, but with use cases built in:

  1. Business needs (be able to filter results based on what I need for business – maybe understanding this by time of day and day of week consumption habits?)
  2. Personal needs (be able to filter results per above)

Currently, I’m using Summify and Knowabout.it.  Both are early in their existence and are making good strides but would love to understand what else is out there?

What I like about Summify:

  • Simple email is sent to me at a specific time (usually in the early AM) with up to 6 items that should be relevant to me based on my RSS + social graph.  I like the simplicity of this.

What I like about Knowabout.it

  • I like the web interface to expand my collection into what other people similar to me are consuming/creating

Media optimization is a big space that I’m tracking for 2011 and expect to make an investment or two.  If you are in the space and want to reach out, I’d welcome it.

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2010 Post Highlights

I’ve written a bunch of posts on this blog in 2010.   Not all are my favorites but below, I’ve highlighted the ones that are.  You can find a list of all-time favorite posts here ranging back to 2006.

Organizational Behavior

Data, Marketing Technology

Twitter & Social

Investing

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Net Neutrality

Net Neutrality protest at  Google HQ - GoogleR...
Image by Steve Rhodes via Flickr

Jon Borthwick (@borthwick) penned a piece for TechCrunch this morning called Neutrality or Bust.   This followed a piece by friend and fellow investor Brad Burnham (@bradUSV) entitled Internet Access Should Be Application Agnostic.

While Net Neutrality has been talked about for years, it’s now getting a lot of attention by the industry because action is about to be taken.  It’s serious and has far reaching implications for the entire ecosystem of advertising, technology, telecommunications, and media.

While I’m not going to write a long essay on what I believe is right, I will point you to the two articles linked above and state my thoughts quite simply:  The Internet has grown at the pace it has because all access has been equal.  I believe it should remain that way.  I do realize however that infrastructure costs  change a bit in a mobile/wireless world and we have enough smart people in this country to figure out a mutually beneficial infrastructure.  Keep the web neutral.

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I Don't Want to be Monogamous

dead SIM
Image by Yaisog Bonegnasher via Flickr

I’ve been thinking about this blog post for a while and finally sitting down to write it.  It’s exactly as the headline sounds… except it’s not about my relationship with my wife, but about my relationship with my mobile phone.

I have an Apple iPhone 4 and have had an iPhone since 2007 with a Blackberry Curve thrown in as a complimentary device for about a year in 2008.

The problem I have with today’s mobile landscape is that the cost of experimenting with different devices is too high.  I shouldn’t have to pick only one device to use at any given time.  I love how when I travel overseas, I can take a SIM card and plug it into multiple different phones.

Being that I get to play with digital media and technology everyday (and get paid for it), I’m probably a bit biased, but I’m curious about the Nexus S, new Windows Phone, and some other smart phones that are in the marketplace.  I’d love to go buy one or two of these devices (pay retail) and plug them into my existing AT&T contract…However, the cost of adding these phones into my current plan are either ridiculously high OR not available and outweighs the benefits.

Will this change?

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