Category Archives: Internet & Web X.0

Come work on the most differentiated product vision in advertising technology

It’s the beginning of the year and many companies are hiring.  So are we (Mozilla).  But why should you consider the job opportunities at Mozilla versus many of the super hot pre-IPO companies that also offer good opportunities?

If you are into advertising and marketing technology, I’d like to think that we offer one of the few truly differentiated value propositions in the ecosystem…  and delivering against this is a huge engineering, product, product-market, and account management challenge.  We truly put the user first – and give them complete control.  In our world, it’s not just what the brand wants… it’s also what the user wants.  We’ve begun to assemble a passionate group of folks who “get” the ad tech space – so there is no lack of intelligent conversations.  We are looking to add to this group of folks, affectionately called Content Services.

Below are three areas that we’re hiring for – right now.  If you are interested in any of these or know someone who is, please reach out thru the contact form on this blog.

Prior to reaching out however, please do the following:

Program Manager
We are hiring for a Program Manager to function between engineering, product, product marketing, business development, account management, data science, and partnerships.  The Program Manager should have 4-8 years of experience of managing multi-thread processes at a scaled technology company but one who still acts as a startup.  What counts?  Details.  Proactivity.  Rallying the troops.  Execution.  Accountability  Getting things done.  Sound interesting?  We have a more robust job-spec ready for those who are interested.  Contact here.

Content Partnerships (agency, brand, publisher)
We are hiring Content Partnerships team members.  In many organizations, these would be considered “sales” or “business development” roles*.  We are looking for people to evangelize our products to agencies and brands and build partnerships that are beneficial to not just the advertiser but to the user (most important) and Mozilla.  What counts?  Pro-activity.  Empathy and judgement for the user.  Understanding our values and not just bringing in a dollar where you can find it.  Creativity.  Accountability.  Sound interesting?  We have a more robust job-spec ready for those who are interested.  Contact here.

Partnership Success Team
I’m not sold on the name of the team yet but we’re looking to build out our success function to our content partnerships.  These roles would generally be labeled as “Account Management” and such – making sure the campaigns and clients are having a successful experience working with Mozilla.  What counts?  Details.  Pro-activity.  Being able to think on your feet.  Resourceful.  Polished.  People-person.  Friendly.  Humorous.  Humble.  Sound interesting?  We have a more robust job-spec ready for those who are interested.  Contact here.

Ideally, you are based in New York, Chicago, Mountain View or San Francisco but willing to consider exquisite candidates in most locations.

 

 

* My friend Jon discusses the name change here.

 

My 2015 Conference Lineup: IAB, Programmatic I/O, Cannes, Dmexco and more

I’ve received some notes from folks asking which conferences I’ll be attending in 2015.  Here is my committed lineup (i.e. hotels booked, flights locked-in) but always subject to change.  Some of these I’m speaking at… and others, not (yet).

IAB Annual Leadership Meeting:  Content and the Kingmakers (February 8-10, Arizona USA)
Programmatic I/O:  AdExchanger (April 16, San Francisco USA)
Digital Media Summit:  Luma Partners (timing TBD)
Cannes Festival (June 21-25, Cannes, France)
Dmexco (Sept 16-17, Cologne, Germany)

* Due to timing issues with other travel, I cannot attend the AdExchanger Industry Preview Conference but I bet it’ll be pretty fantastic.

Looking at the schedule, it’s going to be a busy first half of the year!  If you are heading to IAB Leadership meeting and want to get together, definitely reach out.

Also, if I left a conference out that you think I should attend, please let me know.

2015 Technology, Advertising, and Digital Prediction List

Over the years, I have curated and posted an technology, marketing, advertising, and media trend prediction list on this blog.  This year is no different, I’m going to do it again.  This is a good list to bookmark and reference as you create your presentations throughout the year.

I’ll keep this updated – but I’m not perfect.  Email me if you would like me to include your list (send me blog link and #1 prediction) here.

Predictions for 2015: Uber, Beacons, AdTech, and More (John Battelle)
Thinking about 2015:  Payments, Content Creation, and more
(Darren Herman)
What’s Going to Happen (Fred Wilson)
My 5 Predictions for 2015 and Beyond (Don Dodge)
Mobile Tech Predictions: Android, Amazon, Windows, etc (ZDNet/@jkendrick)
Three Seismic Threats to Marketers (AdAge/@dberkowitz)
The State of Bitcoin and Crytpocurrencies (A16z/@pmarca)
Eight Seismic Changes to the Hispanic Market (MediaPost/Jose Villa)World Economic Forum Predictions: Digital (WEF/Sven Denecken)
What’s Next in Wireless (John Legere)
Tech Predictions:  What Does the Future Hold? (Gary Newe)
20 Questions for 2015 (Benedict Evans)
20 E-Commerce Trends and Predictions for 2015 (eConsultancy)
Predictions for Digital Marketing in 2015 (Adobe/John Watton)
The Future of Digital Media in 2015 (TechCrunch/@pcsathy)
4 Cloud Predictions for 2015 (GigaOm/Barb Darrow)
API Predictions (Steven Willmott)
Predictions for 2015:  There Will be Blood (Valleywag/Dan Lyons)
2015 Tech Predictions (Hany Rashwan)
10 Predictions for Content Marketing (Mashable/Shafqat Islam)
What To Look Out for in Tech 2015 (BI Intelligence)

 

Thinking About 2015: payments, home security, video content, and content consumption

I am up in Manchester, VT where my family and I like to spend our free time in the winters and I have been reflecting on what’s to come this year.  Innovation in payments, home security, video content, and content consumption are areas that I’ll be paying attention to in 2015.

Many of my friends are writing very insightful future pieces and I thought I’d pile on. In years past, I aggregated all of the predictions on this blog and maybe I’ll do that again this year in a latest post.

While I spend most of my time thinking about content and advertising in my day job, much of this post will be outside of that.

Lets begin.

Payments(1). I’ve been fortunate to travel a fair bit across the world – mainly Africa and Europe. In 2015, I’ll be spending some time in Asia but I expect that market to act similar to Europe. Our consumer payments mechanisms here in the USA is much behind pretty much everywhere else. Why in the world do we give our credit cards to a restaurant waiter and have them disappear with our credit card to an unknown place and come back with it processed? I have absolutely zero trust in the waiter and I’m supposed to think that they aren’t going to steal my credit card number? This is 2015… I believe we can do much better…. especially when in most European countries, I process my bill at the table with the waiter- my credit card doesn’t disappear.

I was in New York City with my wife a  week ago doing some shopping and we were at a high-end jacket store in Soho. When it came time to pay, we gave our credit card to the nice lady who was helping us and she disappeared into the back of the store for about 10 minutes. She came back with a shopping bag with our jacket nicely wrapped and our credit card sheet to sign. I joked that she could easily steal our credit card number and low-and-behold, just yesterday my wife’s credit card was compromised and the only place we can track it back to is this upscale jacket store… I’m expecting the payments space to evolve in 2015, or at least want it to.

Home Security:  I’ve got multiple dropcams, nest, and a bunch of other electronic gizmo’s in my home.  I’m getting a bit worried that they could get compromised.  I’m unsure of the destruction that this could lead to (I guess someone can turn off my heat, take pictures with the dropcam, etc) but it’s real and a threat.  I pay an “alarm company” to monitor my home thru traditional methods but this does not cover the network of electronics that pretty much anyone with an internet connection could compromise.  The same way I used to install Norton Antivirus, what will I install on my system to protect me and my gizmos? Some kind of firewall?  I have yet to install electronic locks on my doors as I imagine these are super easy to hack.

Video Content: The more that I watch my kids and their content consumption habits, I keep going long on video content.  I short the traditional networks and long YouTube.  I have to imagine however that the next “YouTube” is on it’s way.  I do not seeing video content being a winner-take-all market.  I have written about in the past and recently about studying content consumption.  More and more content will be created for digital means first – and I’m going to be consuming a bunch of it in 2015.  You should check out @GaryVee’s latest video series if you want to see low-cost video done right.

Content Consumption:  I’ve spent a ton of time thinking about content consumption and it’s evolution.  Instead of focusing on video content and the production capacity as above, I’m thinking more innovation around filters and curation tools.  I use Nuzzle today similarly to how I used Summify (though I still miss Summify!).  I want more tools to help me comb thru the vast world of content and point me in the right direction of what to consume.    Why 2015?  Because we’ve seen success in some of these tools over the past few years and with the prevalence of apps on everyone’s smart phones, we’ll see more tools being downloaded.  There have also been a bunch of companies who have gone down the content consumption path and a lot of talent/people who have led experiments and hypothesis.  The time is ripe.

I’m interested in all of these areas.  If you’re an entrepreneur or investor in these areas, I’d love to hear from you.

 

(1) Payments:  I know that payments is an insanely broad topic with multiple forks.  I am specifically looking at the last mile – where the consumer interacts with a person or point-of-sale to initiate and complete a transaction.

My journey in becoming a Mozillian

I decided to try out Medium this morning while traveling back from #mozlandia.  You can view the original post here.

I have also pasted the post below (minus the cute picture of part of the team).

My 365 day journey of becoming a Mozillian

My name is Darren Herman and I’m the Vice President of Content Services at Mozilla. I can be found at @dherman76 on Twitter. This is the first time I’m telling this story publicly and the first time my team is seeing it. I am blessed to work with such an amazing group of individuals and hope you can all relate to the below.

Today is just after my one year anniversary at Mozilla, but only now do I feel like I could consider myself a Mozillian. Maybe other Mozillians won’t consider me one yet, but at least I’m on my way. As I fly back from #mozlandia, our official all-Mozilla meeting in Portland, I have begun to reflect on this.

#

I remember back to my first day on the job in Mountain View that it felt amazing to be a Mozillian. At that time, I did not realize that I was not a Mozillian but I was just a new employee at Mozilla who was just starting the journey to become a Mozillian.

#

My past year has been turbulent, exciting, devastating, inspiring, unbalanced, curious, stressful, and amazing. I never thought you could group those words in the same sentence but those were all emotions I felt over the past year.

The majority of the senior executive team that I interviewed with and which hired me are now gone. The inspiring technologist and inventor of Javascript who many of us came to work for unfortunately left… Scary in my eyes.

One of my most intense moments of emotions was when I felt a sense of inspiration and excitement when I took the stage at the IAB Leadership Summit back in February to talk about Mozilla’s intentions within the advertising ecosystem. The talk at the conference was well received and I was in my glory moment.

Maybe an hour after I walked off stage, the reality of my new role set in to Mozilla. Mozillians, the community, and many users erupted at me, almost like the human immune system reacting with a toxin. My flight back to New York from the IAB Summit was filled with dozens of emails with our communications team to figure out how to calm a storm I created. Mozilla getting into advertising? No fucking way.

In my head I was thinking to myself… I came to Mozilla to evolve the advertising industry and content space but what I’m trying to do is constantly rejected? WTF. Why am I here? And more so, I left one of the best roles on Madison Avenue thanks to the generosity of my former employer for this?

I received threats from our community. I received flaming emails. I received a lot of resistance.

It was time to re-evaluate my time at Mozilla so I did. I went to my coach, my wife, my brother, my father, and my mentors and we chatted. Per their feedback and my decision process, I quietly resigned and I continued an old conversation with a pre-IPO hot company to take a c-level role doing things I had former comfort in and with a leader who I respect more than 99% of people I’ve ever met.

By the end of this December, my plan was to exit Mozilla and start in 2015 at the new opportunity.

But something funny happened to me on the way to Mountain View for the 10th Anniversary of Firefox.

In the weeks leading up to the 10th Anniversary, my work life at Mozilla started to change a bit. My team had grown from back in February and we’d shipped code. We’d launched Tiles with some commercial partners and landed the Interest Dashboard in the AMO. In an engineering culture this is the holy grail, much more than talking about something or even showing mockups. We shipped code. We fucking shipped code.

I’m not going to say that we got all the respect in the world inside of Mozilla, but I started getting less hate mail, the tweets became positive, and the community became super curious.

I also began talking different. It’s weird to say that and it was something I never realized earlier this year. I used words that were second nature to me but not second nature to Mozilla. I used words that scared people. Hint: don’t ever say synergy. I tweaked my vocabulary. Had I done this for my talk at the IAB Leadership Summit, I would have probably had 90% less issues, but hindsight is 20/20.

My team, which is probably the smallest (but growing) inside of Mozilla, started to snowball. We were knocking off bugs. We got momentum in the press. Our talks with commercial partners for selling advertising tiles was beyond well received. There was real hope in all of our eyes that we could begin to change this ecosystem.

At around 6am PST on November 10, I walked into the Mountain View office for the big 10th Anniversary celebration with anticipation that this would be my last time in Mozilla Mountain View but all of the emotions from above started to hit me.

I texted my absolutely amazing wife and said that it was bittersweet that I was leaving Mozilla now as the hard part was probably mostly behind us. I’d resigned a month or so earlier but I actually now might want to stay.

I was given 5–10 minutes during our celebration to talk about what Content Services was doing in front of all Mozillians. Hundreds of Mozilla employees were physically present and others were connected over our Vidyo conference system. I asked my team to join me on “stage” (no real stage) as I went thru a slide deck of some of the products we’d launched and landed and for the first time, we got an applause; what I interpreted to be a real-one. After the talk was over, Mozillians that I had never met before came up to me and said things like: I can’t believe you’re still here but we’re lucky to have you, I now get what you’re trying to do and holy shit it’s cool, and we know this was a hard year for your team and you but hang in there.

It felt good. So good that I went into my transition meeting later in the day and the meeting lasted less than 5 minutes. I decided to stay at Mozilla and Chris Beard, our CEO gave me a second chance and vouched his support.

Fast forward. #mozlandia

I believe it was Chris who had the genius idea to bring 1200–1300 Mozilla employees to Portland this past week. We had a rough year, collectively due to management changes, etc, and thought that bringing us all together would strengthen our bonds and get us aligned for 2015.

A few things clicked for me at #mozlandia that make me feel like a Mozillian.

  1. I gave a presentation to all of Mozilla on the big stage one morning and there was applause and laughs. I had the most dangerous subject (advertising) and showed a disruptive path forward that was received.
  2. I met many different teams over the course of the week and proved I was human. So I think. I shared a beer with people who had called me out on Twitter earlier in the year and while we probably aren’t best drinking buddies yet, we didn’t kill each other either. We listened to each other and had constructive conversations.
  3. I saw the passion in my teams eyes about what we’re aiming to tackle which is monumental and not easy. But the passion is there and we are all aligned.

I feel stronger than ever that Mozilla is an amazing place. We have a real mission that’s not encumbered by another person, investor, shareholder, or partners priority. Our mission is probably as true and noble as one could be.

It took me a year to truly understand this and I’m still learning each day. If you are reading this and witnessed this all happening over the last 365 days, I thank you for your support. Thank you for showing me the Mozilla way. Thank you for continuing to nurture me into the culture.

Showing is worth more than talking. Watch our code. It’s open. And fucking amazing. Get ready. I’m excited for 2015.

The Independent Web

Since I joined Mozilla almost a year ago, I have been more conscious of the independent web meme.   Today, Mozilla celebrates it’s 10th Anniversary of Firefox which is all about choice, control, and transparency on the web [1].

While I was personally aware of independence on the Internet (I’ve been a Firefox user for a long time), I truly did not comprehend the importance of this subject.  Last night on my flight out to Mountain View (thru SFO), I watched The Rise and Rise of Bitcoin and this reinforced independent thinking as it pertains to global currency.

If you live, work, or gain value from the web, which I believe every single person reading this post, I highly suggest you start reading up on the independence of the web as it’s truly one of the worlds most important innovations and too many of us take it for granted or take advantage of it.

At Mozilla, we put together this video that talks about independence.  Enjoy it.

Happy 10th Anniversary Firefox.

[1] For those blog readers who are in the advertising and/or publishing sectors, read the post I wrote about trust, transparency, and control for users on the web and with advertising.

VRM, The Intention Economy, and The Thank You Economy

It’s not uncommon for me to get the questions, what looks interesting to you these days? … or where are you focused?  Since joining Mozilla, I’ve filtered pretty much all of my knowledge and history with “user empowerment” and the area I keep coming back to is the quiet but growing VRM space.  For those unfamiliar with the term, it’s Vendor Relationship Management, the opposite and complimentary tool of CRM:  Customer Relationship Management.

PowertothePeople

The VRM conversation is being championed by Doc Searls of Harvard Berkman Center but at this point, the ecosystem is growing larger than the one individual.  You might recognize Doc’s name as he was one of the authors of the book, Cluetrain Manifesto and followed it up with The Intention Economy.

In the beginning of The Intention Economy, Doc posits that soon, customers will be able to:

  • Control the flow and use of personal data
  • Build their own loyalty programs
  • Dictate their own terms of service
  • Tell whole markets what they want, how they want it, where and when they should be able to get it, and how much it should cost

When you think about these four points, they empower the customer/user and play nicely into the idea of VRM.   Joe Mandese, a VRM list subscriber and all around amazing MediaPost Editor-in-Chief wrote a piece recently titled:  Acronymity:  The Three Most Important Letters You’ve Never Heard Of.  In this piece, Mandese writes about the shift from brands at center to users at center of the value equation.

Per the above points and Mandese’s piece, you’ll start to see some consistency around empowering the user.

On Madison Avenue, there is a lot of talk about empowering the user but the funny thing is, it’s done completely opaque, without user permission (or with permission under a ton of legalese), and the user has been given no access to their data…. among many other things.

Social media has pushed us a little closer to a world of VRM….incrementally- but at least in the right direction.  In social channels, users have a voice – one that can be exponentially radiated.   If I have a bad experience on Delta, a simple 140 character tweet can help solve the problem where not-so-long-ago, it took a penned letter and weeks of waiting to hear back from them.

In The Thank You Economy, Gary Vaynerchuck writes, now customers’ demands for authenticity, originality, creativity, honesty, and good intent have made it necessary for companies and brands to revert to a level of customer service rarely seen since our great-grandparents’ day, when business owners often knew their customers personally, and gave them individual attention.

Books

The power of social media (individual voices) and VRM (individuals being empowered, commercially or otherwise) will put us ahead in the next decade.  It’s a bigger opportunity than search (SEM*).  So, this is where I’m focused for now and hiring people and meeting people who want to experiment here.   If you do, please contact me.

* SEM:  probably one of the purest forms of intentcasting which plays into the VRM space but is not entirely the VRM space.

 

Are You a Mozillian?

I’m sitting in my hotel room in San Francisco having bought a one-way ticket here late this past Wednesday night.   Why did I come out with no-end in sight?  I bought a ticket because we were in the midst of a crisis and wanted to be closer to our senior leadership team and board.

For those who don’t know, I joined Mozilla in December of 2013 and am now a Mozillian.  I lead our Content Services group.

I tweeted last night the following:

But this post is not going to be about what everyone is talking about online regarding Mozilla.  Or my Tweet last night.  This post is what Nick Bilton tried to do with his NY Times article but did not point to something that’s very important to me and ultimately, us as Mozillians.

The majority of the media and world lacks an understanding of what Mozilla does and why we do it.  We’re a non-profit.  We have certain ideals and values.   And much more.

What I’d like to do is point you to a video that is super important to us.  It’s on YouTube and it’s called “Are you a Mozillian.”  In the video, it has many clips from the Mozilla Summit that was held in 2013.  You’ll hear from many different Mozillians about what’s important to us and where we are headed.

What’s important about Mozillia is that it’s not about any one of us.  Darren Herman at Mozilla is just one person.  But the overall Mozilla Project is much, much larger than me or any of my peers.  What we are doing is a big challenge but one that is ultimately needed in this world.   We have come to lean on the Internet and take it for granted.  That’s OK – as long as you know that there are certain values that are being upheld to make that Internet experience innovative, open, and creating opportunity for all.

If this is interesting to you, read more about our mission.

Note, I wasn’t asked to write this.  I just got sick of reading all of the negative articles online.  Life is too short for negativity.  I like to surround myself with people and content that move things forward.  I hope you do too.

Why I Still Pay for Content and An Opportunity for Publishers

Image from Juliette Millien

Fred’s post this morning inspired a response from me.  I haven’t done a response post in a while but then again, I haven’t been updating this blog as much as I used to (hopefully that changes in 2014 but you heard that in 2012).

I pay for content, at least the majority of time.  I subscribe to the NY Times and WSJ – annual digital subscriptions.  I also pay for Wired Magazine, Netflix, Cable, and the Stocktwits50.  I also subscribe to Satellite Radio in my cars and purchase the enhanced traffic package.  I used to subscribe to a couple of Letter.ly’s while they existed and Business 2.0 Magazine.  While I could get access to much of this content other ways, having a login/password allows me to access it quickly when I’m on the train commuting to and from work or while laying on the couch enjoying a few minutes before my kids wake up in the AM.

Years ago, my brother and I would sit on Hotline SW, Kazaa, Napster, eDonkey, and other p2p services and download an album or two but most of the time, we had a greater chance of getting a computer virus than finding the album we specifically wanted.  I quickly realized that driving to the Borders or Barnes and Noble was faster to get an album then waiting for it to download on on a 14.4, 33.6 or 56k modem…. and so, I kept buying albums but mostly in the retail store.  *

“Time” is the reason why I pay for content. Saving more than a few minutes to access content is what I pay for.  We have very limited time on this earth, so I’m willing to pay a premium for things to happen quickly and efficiently so I can do more of what I love.  I’d rather die playing on the tennis court than sitting in front of Google Maps trying to find the court.

I cannot believe I’m alone in my thoughts about “time.”  So, if “time” is the reason why we pay, then we can create a mutually beneficial business model around it.

Publisher case:
Strategy:  Create revenue streams thru the sale of access to first party content.
Insight:  Based on my own habits, I hypothesize people might pay for content because it removes any friction of access to content in turn making it much quicker to access.  Speed.Opportunity:  I wrote about this opportunity here in 2010, but I still think it remains true.  IF publishers are going to wall-their-garden, then only wall-it for the first 12-24 hours of an article’s life.

So yes, I pay for content and believe there is a way to get publishers paid for the great content they create.  Advertising is not the only way to support great content.

* Now that we have much faster Internet access, I pretty much buy all my music from iTunes and Spotify subscriptions

Why I’m Bullish on Programmatic Media

I’ve been immersed in programmatic media for pretty much my professional career.  Whether in advertising, in-game ads, search, or other areas, I’ve spent a lot of time automating and implementing [technological] pipes into the advertising industry.

I am becoming more bullish than ever on the overall idea of programmatic media.  Let me test out a few proof statements with you and comment below with your thoughts.

1.  When technological progress is not about the technology, it gets adopted by the masses.  From 2008-2012, so much of the conversation was about the features of every DSP, DMP, Exchange, Workflow and other solutions within the programmatic media industry.  One day we’d hear that one DSP was better than another because of a feature but 30 days later, it would change.  I feel like today, we’re not focused on those respective features any longer… we’re focused on the overall business and vision of the companies because we know that the features already exist within them.  I feel like the “Cold War” of DSP’s is over and now we’re into the “business building” phase.

2.    Innovation is happening further from the center.
Again, from 2008-2012, almost every company in the programmatic space was centered around building bidders and pipes… for good reason.  Now that we’ve saturated that specific part of the programmatic stack, we’re now seeing innovation occur further away from the bidder.  Companies like Bionic, Centro, and others are helping marketers purchase programmatically but not necessarily highlighting the programmatic execution.  The execution of programmatic does not matter to most, even though it’s occurring in the background.

Also of note here are the programmatic-DNA companies popping up.  Pre-programmatic-DNA companies were technology organizations that had to pivot and add programmatic technologies to their offering or risk being disrupted (i.e. ValueClick).  Now we’re seeing pure programmatic-DNA companies who are operating from the ground up, completely programmatically and recognizing efficiency and effectiveness gains.

3.  Open Innovation in Programmatic
More often than not, the first industry constituents to solve a problem are private companies with closed ecosystems.  We’ve seen at least one example of the evolution of this into an open ecosystem now with the emergence of RTBKit, a github based project that allows anyone to download the infrastructure of a bidder, the central tool to purchasing impressions in a world of real-time media.

4.  5-20% of Paid [Digital] Media
Agencies and their respective holding companies are talking about how they expect to see their programmatic spend grow to 5-20% of their overall paid digital media.  I believe that this number is low, especially on the lower-side of this number.  I believe that vendors are using programmatic ways of procuring media and most agencies are not aware of this… so realistically, the number will be higher.   It will be telling if/when AppNexus goes public, to see the amount of gross dollars moving thru their exchange as it’ll help us understand the total dollar volume of this industry.

5.  Programmatic Media is Designed for Accountability
Gone are the days of Wannamaker’s famous quote.  If you are still using the above quote to defend your media plan, then you might as well start packing up your agency or CMO-job. Programmatic media is designed to be accountable from the ground up, fully measured and every opportunity to be attributed.  With Chief Marketing Officer’s having to justify every $1 they invest in media in the market, they need to purchase accountable media.  Note, I am not saying in any way that creativity is going away, I’m purely saying that the container for programmatic media is completely accountable so this is a win-win for the ecosystem.

Lastly, I’m bullish on programmatic media because we’re going outside of media for the programmatic conversation. Uber, airbnb, eBay, Zurvu, and many other platforms are programmatic.  In some of the investment circles that I’m in, we’re discussing the businesses outside of advertising that are being transformed programmatically.  This, at least to me, is very exciting.