Category Archives: Advertising & Marketing

Mad Men is Back

For 2 hours last night, I sat uninterrupted while watching AMC’s debut of Season 5 of Mad Men.  They did a great job recapping Season 4 and setting up plenty of plot opportunities for the remainder of this season.

I’ve always wondered what it would be like to watch Mad Men without having worked in an advertising agency.  I guess it’s like watching CSI Miami for me, as I’ve never worked in public safety.  There are plenty of subtleties that you pick up while watching having worked in the industry.

A few things stuck out from last night’s show:

1.  Pete’s power move of gaurding his potential clients and using them as leverage for a new office.
2.  The Heinz presentation that shows that not everything Madison Avenue does is right the first time… this is so true and often goes overlooked.
3.   Sounds like SCDP are going after a new airlines which back in the day, were the top accounts to have
4.  I like the scenes on Metro North railroad as I too take the train in each day.  It’s a nice touch.

It’s amazing how the producers of the show are able to replicate the 1950s, even down to Metro North.  It’s impressive.  I’m looking forward to the rest of the season!

Oh, I was interviewed by Paper Magazine for an article titled, “Meet New York’s Mad Men and Mad Women.”  Enjoy.

Search is bought, not sold

Over the past month or so since I first heard the line, “search is bought, media is sold,” I’ve been thinking about it as it’s resonated as both a media planner/buyer and a marketing/ad tech investor.

I went thru the exercise to understand this statement at its core:  why is search bought and why is media sold?

Search on any advertising campaign is pretty much a “must buy.”  Why?  Search is about Intent.  My colleague Taylor writes about it here and here.

Dictionary.com defines Intent the state of a person’s mind that directs his or her actions toward a specific object.

If a person is telling a search engine that they are already going to a specific object, then making it as a frictionless as possible to move said person from search to object is what a search engine delivers.  Pretty simple.

Search is almost cheating from an advertising perspective.  Yes, I said it.  There is no genius or persuasion to search.  Google built an empire that will keep returning cash until their search engine is no longer relevant.  The $200B market capitalization isn’t because Google has built a much better advertising technology, but because Google is playing on the key insight of Intent.  It was and continues to be genius; I wish I had done that.

While search ad copy is extremely important, especially on competitive keyword terms, capturing the Intent is pretty much a numbers game done thru the smarts of the search engine marketing (“SEM”) technologies and the SEM/biddable media analysts using them.

Media is sold, which means that a sales person (or API) needs to contact an agency or marketer directly, build a relationship, and sell in their wares.  This is very different than search.  I like to think that nothing is a must-buy other than paid search.

A good sales person with relationships and a great product must sell to be part of a plan and make a case why.  Alternatively, and increasingly, we’re using API’s to connect us to programmatic sources of buying non-search media that is removing the day to day sales person out of the picture.  Industries evolve.

Data to enhance targeting generally should win out on a media plan before any time of blind or proxy-audience buy.  The picture below illustrates this notion.  The old way of buying media was to start broad and then narrow down based on performance.  Now, it’s about starting narrow because we can, and then getting broader if it’s needed and budget allows.  It’s not that marketers are spending less, it’s that they are more refined in their targeting.

Targeting

What this overall thought proves is that the use of data, at least in the “intent” stage, will drive results.  It’s validated;  $200B worth of market capitalization, validated.

This leads me to an investment thesis of who else is capturing Intent beyond traditional search engines and how can we partner with those companies to accelerate them.  If you know of any, I’d love to chat.

We Are Hiring – Are You Looking?

There’s a lot of talk about job creation in the USA.  Well, we’re certainly doing our part here at the agency.  Here at The Media Kitchen, we are riding a new business win streak and are staffing up at all levels.  At kbs+ Ventures, our portfolio companies are pretty much all hiring too.

Today, we’re going to focus on some roles for The Media Kitchen, which is something I don’t normally talk about on this blog so I figure it’ll be some fresh content.

We are looking for Associate Strategists up thru Group Directors to join our team as we’re staffing up based on some recent new business wins.  The Media Kitchen is an integrated media agency that handles all media types, believes in the paid/owned/earned landscape and is a medium sized shop (about 110 chefs across our NYC and Atlanta office).  I think we’re pretty fantastic but that’s totally biased as I’m the Chief Digital Media Officer here.  Here is some of our thinking on Slide Share.  Here’s our tumblog.

We are looking for “chefs” with the following attributes & talent:

  • Curiosity.  We find that the best chefs are the most curious and like to explore all different areas.  You don’t just have to be curious about digital or media, but that certainly helps too.
  • Digital understanding.  We plan all media types here at The Media Kitchen, however, we are looking people who might have a few more chromosomes who favor digital than other channels as much of the business you’d be working on are skewed towards digital planning.
  • Digital is less of a channel and more of an enabler.  You should share the belief that digital as we know it is changing and it’s becoming an enabler on other platforms.
  • Nice.  We only hire nice people.  If you have a large ego or cannot play well with others, this agency probably isn’t for you.
  • Great.  Are you great?  You should think so, and if so, we want to talk with you.

I’m sure there are  more attributes and talent that we’re looking for and our hiring team will be able to tease that out.  If you meet the above filters, then at least contact me and I’ll make sure to get you in touch with the right people here*.

Reach out to me if you are interested in pursuing a career at The Media Kitchen.  We are looking to hire immediately.

* If you match the criteria I’m looking for and that your first impression is a good one!

Data Alone Is Not A Winning Proposition

I was fortunate enough to be asked by Ari & David Goldberg to speak at their State of Style Summit which was held today at the 92st Y in Tribeca.  They threw an A+ event and the turn-out of attendees was awesome; it looked like standing room only from the stage.  Job well done, Goldbergs.

On stage, I talked about data and the application of data for marketing along with Joe Zawadzki from MediaMath and Albert Azout of Sociocast.  I was on a tangent a bit and gave the crowd a laugh with the following quote:

It got re-tweeted a lot.

Looking back at it, it is immensely important.

Data is at all of our finger tips.  When you step on the scale each morning, look at your fitbit stats, log into your Mint.com account, or even review your Amex charges, you are looking at data that can then be turned into insights and then be actioned upon.

However, data alone does not mean action.  When I step on the scale in the mornings and am trending towards Alec Baldwin rather than Ryan Gosling, I’m not actioning data.   This is important.  Data alone does not make decisions.

An organization built for the next century is one who has to be able to wonk through large datasets, find insights and action them.  Just having data alone is not a winning proposition.  It’s the application of data, the extrapolation, and understanding that will lead to competitive differentiation.

If I was actioning the data from the scale, I’d not be eating this delicious chocolate chip cookie and tea from Mae Mae Cafe as I wrote this post.

Super Bowl XLVI Advertising, When TV Spots Are No Longer TV Spots

If you’ve been watching any of the major television channels over the past week, you’ve probably seen a little button on some of the commercials that pops up with a call to action to Shazam.  For those unfamiliar with this nifty app, it allows you to use your mobile device to take a sample of a sound in a room and send it to Shazam returning details surrounding the particular sound.  This initially launched around music – and I personally use it quite often to help me figure out who the artist is of a particular song so I can download the track at a later time.

Over the past 6 months, I’ve seen an increasing amount of television spots using Shazam technology to help consumers learn more about a product.  Back in February 2011, an Old Navy television spot featured Kim Kardashian singing and had a link out to Shazam.   This is the first commercial I saw that adopted this technology.  Since, some big brands are starting to use mobile to extend television spots.  Last night, I was watching 30 Rock on my DVR (lots of catching up to do) and there was a commercial for Progressive with a Shazam logo.  I took out my iPhone and Shazam’d it – and captured the screen shot here.

I’m predicting that we are going to see quite a few Super Bowl spots with Shazam tie-ins.  I’m not the first nor won’t be the last to say this.  AdWeek, back in June, predicted we’d see up to a third of all commercials.  They could be right.

While this is not an endorsement or commercial for Shazam perse, it’s a statement of stitching together multiple screens.  If brands are going down this path, they need to be thinking about the connected screen experience.  My buddy Pete calls this the Connected14I’ve written about it here.

Super Bowl XLVI could kick off (no pun intended) the main stream adoption of the connected experience.  I hope so.

Stores in an Information Society

I live in the suburbs of Manhattan and within an 8 minute drive from my home, I’m surrounded with retail stores… and there are a lot of them:  standalone, strip malls, and large malls.  Many of these stores were built when we lived in the industrial revolution society as that’s when urban planning was done for this area.

The industrial revolution is over.  Long ago.

We’re now in the information revolution.  Many things should change in this new chapter of life but the one area I’d like to highlight is the retail experience.

I’ve had many poor experiences lately in retail locations, even from stores which are supposed to have excellent in-store staff.  The more and more I go about my daily life and see how my kids are living theirs, retail stores need to adapt because consumers are now less than 3 clicks away from buying almost any item sold in any store at any time on any day.  Do retail stores really need to be tens of thousands of square feet and sell/stock everything in their catalog which is redundant to their e-commerce store?

Why can’t retail stores be discovery-and-customer-service engines staffed by salaried product specialists?  The actual goods that I might want to buy, maybe outside the top 10, would be ordered online and be delivered to my home or a central pickup area.  Stores would have a lot less overhead, smaller, wouldn’t be competing with their e-commerce P&L, attribution of marketing would be easier (shopping in one place), and product distribution would be easier for brands.  This doesn’t sound half bad…

Retail needs to change.  Just look at Best Buy.

Marketing Wednesdays: Display Impressions

One sentence exec summary:  New measurement of advertising impressions are helping drive performance for marketers.

When we purchase media, one of the major components of the buy is around how many impressions we will achieve with a campaign.  The common thought here is that the optimal amount of impressions against a target audience will yield positive advertising results.  This is fairly common thinking around Madison Avenue and has led us to using the Nielsen metrics as currency for TV, circulation metrics for print, and unique visitors as being important for digital media.  The higher the rating, the larger the circulation and the more unique visitors a media property has, the higher the amount of impressions, theoretically* and thus, the more media spend that they can handle.

I personally and professionally believe that it’s not about the impressions, but about the engagements.  Engagements can be quantified many different ways (thru sales to interactions) but just impressions alone is not a basis for marketing working or not.

In digital, there is a never ending supply of advertising inventory especially when publishers like this put stories across 5 or 30 pages.  Creating more ad impressions is not the problem with digital.  3rd party ad serving systems such as DART, Atlas, MediaMind, MediaPlex, AdZerk, adk2, OpenX, and others were created to help manage advertising inventory for pubs and advertisers.  Not only do ad servers help us serve media but they also help us track the performance which allows us to understand which media partners are doing well.

Historically, this was always about the amount of impressions served and the respective clicks or engagements on a unit.  This post is not about clicks or click thru rates, as that’s an entire topic in itself, and you can read about it hereWhat we will discuss through the rest of this post is how we as marketers should be tracking an impression.

As you have viewed on many websites during your normal course of web surfing, banners and ad units are all over a respective page and sometimes, you cannot even see the units as they might be below the fold.  Generally** as long as the web page and assets load (tags fire), then the advertising units on the page log impressions, regardless if the user scrolls over them or engages.

Sounds weird, right?  An advertiser pays for impressions without confirmation that the user has at least had the ability to see the advertisement.

Since 2008, we’ve seen startups like DoubleVerify, AdXpose, and AdSafe (amongst others) help marketers understand what how many of their impressions are in-view along with many other non-standard ad server metrics.  The in-view metric is important because that’s the number that should count for impressions (in my theoretical perfect world).  Lately, ad serving solutions such as MediaMind have incorporated this metric into reporting but it’s not historically standard across 3rd party ad servers (which is shocking).

Today marks a big day for the digital media community because comScore released the vCE, which is what they are touting as “campaign essentials” and it’s built on a product they created and merged with AdXpose called the vGRP to validate the impressions served and displayed by publishers.  The vGRP is very interesting because it goes beyond traditional measurement of 3rd party ad serving solutions to include things like time on screen and in-view/out of view.  While admittedly I’ve not run a campaign yet with the vCE/vGRP, I hypothesize based on historical campaign performance we’ve run, that a paid media campaign will yield better performance when a higher composition of impressions are in-view and for no less than a minimum amount of time.  Not rocket science.

Additionally, other companies are building advanced measurement solutions to help understand display impressions better.  The Goodharts over at MOAT are building a brand analytics dashboard which help marketers understand how many people are hovering over their display advertisements.  The theory here is that the more that a user hovers over an impression, the higher the engagement, and thus, the better a campaign will perform.

Evolution is occuring in the digital space.  From the days of offline media based on circulation and rating points to a now “validated” actualized number of impressions being seen digitally.  Over the next decade or so, we’ll see our online measurement systems (tools/technology/process) brought to traditionally offline channels.  Then, we’ll be able to really understand our media performance.

* Why I said theoretically is because advertising dollars don’t always follow the amount of impressions.  Some impressions are worth more, and potentially, you can spend more for fewer qualified impressions.  Think webmd or other niche publishers.

**  I say generally here because it’s more often than not

*** I lifted the above image from the website of MOAT.

One Buying Platform for All Media

Back in June 2011, I wrote a post titled, The 87.5% Category According to Luma – Lots of Acquisitions.  The purpose of the article was to highlight that ad serving systems for online/digital media had a high propensity to be acquired or realize a significant exit.  87.5% of all ad servers on the chart had gone through an exit.  Not bad.

Over the last week of December, I spent some time at home and caught up on my favorite blogs and online content in between playing with my two kids.  In doing this, I spent time reading a December 20th post on AdExchanger by Google’s VP of Display, Neal Mohan.  While I’ve personally never met Neal, I have a lot of respect for what he’s doing at Google.  He has a great quote that I couldn’t agree with more:

We also know that advertisers and agencies ideally don’t want a separate buying platform for each type of media — they want a way to buy across all formats, and in 2012 I think they’ll get it. Real-time bidding (and by extension audience buying) has proven to be a transformative technology for buying desktop display — on our exchange, it currently accounts for 60 percent of all transactions. In 2012, we’ll start getting into that ballpark for mobile and video as well.

If you recall, when I wrote the 87.5% article, I highlighted an area in particular stands out to me as a killer opportunity:

If I personally was to start a company tomorrow, I’d probably create the next 3rd party ad serving system built for the future of all media (able to serve site-direct placements, social media and RTB) and include the opportunity for biddable, rich media, video, and full reporting & analytics.  I believe no ad serving system delivers superior reporting and analytics so this is an area that I’d specifically make sure I’d nail.

I think this is an area for massive innovation because the vision that the industry hasn’t recognized the full vision for the future… I believe that all media will be served, tracked, and optimized across all channels.  Television, print, radio, and out of home will all in some way or another be served, tracked and optimized.  This obviously cannot happen overnight as there are quite a few barriers and obstacles to go thru, but the opportunity is huge.  There is a reason why 87.5% of the companies in the ad serving segment have been acquired.

It looks like Neal and I are thinking the same thing and if any of you entrepreneurs are as well, I’d love to meet you.  This is an area that we are searching to invest in at kbs+ Ventures.  You can contact me here.

The Connected14 Strategy

One of my friends runs an engagement agency in Irvine, CA called The Buddy Group.  One of the services he sells clients is a “Connected14” strategy which intrigued me since the day he mentioned it.  Essentially, the Connected14 is an engagement strategy (and execution) across your 1 foot experience (tablet, mobile phone), 3 foot (desktop/laptop), and 10 foot (Smart TV).  There is a nice video that explains it here.

CES has had no groundbreaking product announcements this year, but the common thread that linked the whole show together for me was connectivity (I was there).  Consumers are purchasing an increasing amount of devices that are connected to the web and this is going to open up opportunities where marketers can deliver a well thought out and planned experience across the Connected14.  It is not good enough anymore to deliver the same experience and creative across all three devices at the same time for a brand.  We should be taking advantages of the intricacies of the devices and building engagements that are tailored to each, but connected thru a strategy so they can be used at the same time to amplify their impact.

I really like the Connected14 idea and would like to see the industry really start embracing and thinking about.  The one fact that we can all basically agree on is that we are becoming more connected and not less.  Time to continue/start planning for it.

Google Controls 5.85% of Worldwide Advertising

According to some simple excel calculations (see below), Google controls about 5.85% of the worldwide advertising billings.  According to a recent article I was reading, ZenithOptimedia has 2012 advertising expenditures pegged around $485 billion.  Google derives 97% of its revenue from advertising so they are around $28.4bln.  Do the math and it comes out to 5.85%.

The majority of this is derived from their search engine marketing practice, which is otherwise known as AdWords.  If Google nails display, can get TV seriously off the ground, participate in organic search (take a look at our, kbs+ Ventures,  portfolio company Yieldbot), and dominate the tablet/mobile market, then they could realistically get up to 10-20%.

Pretty amazing for a company that was founded in 1998.

Calculations