Category Archives: Advertising & Marketing

What we’re working on at Mozilla

I just released a post on Advancing Content (our Mozilla blog) that talks about what we’re up to and why.  I think it’s a pretty important piece for the ad, content, and tech industry to read so I hope you do.  And if you find the piece interesting, please re-tweet/share.  The more people who read the piece and understand our mission, the better.

And so when I hear privacy advocates saying that it is the role of the browser to deliver tools for the user to protect their privacy, I agree.  And when I hear Randall Rothenberg saying that browser vendors have a responsibility to our culture and to our economy, I agree.  I do not believe that these aims are in direct conflict.  We need advertising experiences that work for advertisers and publishers, but that also respect the wishes – the agency – of the user.  The user needs to be at the center of the experience, and their desires must be respected in the value exchange.

The above is a snippet from the piece.  Read the whole thing here.

Ads that fit in

Ever since I was on the agency side, I wrestled with the idea of Native Advertising because it was a new name for something that already existed. When questioned by the press or clients, I would define native ads as ads embedded into the UI/UX of the site. But who really cares, how is this new?

At Mozilla, we have a super smart team thinking about and building new advertising products for Firefox in our Content Services group. These products started rolling out in November 2014 at global scale and have had some moderate success so far.

We’ve been experimenting with the format of the advertising experiences and have initially settled on the format of the “tile,” the rectangle that appears on your New:Tab page of your Firefox browser. Most modern browsers have these tiles as they provide quick access to your most frequent and recent websites.

Why did we initially pick the tile as the place to begin our experimentation? Because the New:Tab page already exists in the browser and is a place where hundreds of millions of users are used to seeing their tiles, whether or not they realize they are called tiles.

In a conversation today with Dan Greenberg, the CEO/founder of Sharethrough and members of his team, he termed native advertising as “ads that fit in.” When thinking about our tiles ads in Firefox, I would propose and Dan would probably agree that they are native units. The ads fit in naturally without disrupting our users.

So the tough job is on us at Mozilla… now that we’ve found the right spot initially for the adverts (tiles), we need to present our users with quality and relevant content within it. We are working hard on that.

Thinking About Virtual and Augmented Reality

Thanks to Benjamin de Wit of the Amsterdam based We Make VR, I’ve started to take a close look at the Virtual and Augmented Reality (“VR”) marketplace.  I was in the virtual world (gaming) space for a while but now that we have headsets and augmented lenses, I’m interested in the applications beyond gaming.

I am going to pick up a Samsung Galaxy Note 4 for work (we make a Firefox browser for Android) and will also pick up the Samsung VR to check out some of the initial content created for virtual worlds.

I still have a hard time thinking that there will be hundreds of millions of headsets sold in the short term but I have to imagine that the technologies will evolve and not require crazy head contraptions.  From there, network effects happen and more content will be created since more headsets are in circulation.

Side note:  If I was an advertising holding company (i.e. MDC Partners, WPP, IPG, Omnicom, etc), I would acquire a bunch of VR production studios right now to build the best-in-class highly interactive content.  Just sayin’.

Come work on the most differentiated product vision in advertising technology

It’s the beginning of the year and many companies are hiring.  So are we (Mozilla).  But why should you consider the job opportunities at Mozilla versus many of the super hot pre-IPO companies that also offer good opportunities?

If you are into advertising and marketing technology, I’d like to think that we offer one of the few truly differentiated value propositions in the ecosystem…  and delivering against this is a huge engineering, product, product-market, and account management challenge.  We truly put the user first – and give them complete control.  In our world, it’s not just what the brand wants… it’s also what the user wants.  We’ve begun to assemble a passionate group of folks who “get” the ad tech space – so there is no lack of intelligent conversations.  We are looking to add to this group of folks, affectionately called Content Services.

Below are three areas that we’re hiring for – right now.  If you are interested in any of these or know someone who is, please reach out thru the contact form on this blog.

Prior to reaching out however, please do the following:

Program Manager
We are hiring for a Program Manager to function between engineering, product, product marketing, business development, account management, data science, and partnerships.  The Program Manager should have 4-8 years of experience of managing multi-thread processes at a scaled technology company but one who still acts as a startup.  What counts?  Details.  Proactivity.  Rallying the troops.  Execution.  Accountability  Getting things done.  Sound interesting?  We have a more robust job-spec ready for those who are interested.  Contact here.

Content Partnerships (agency, brand, publisher)
We are hiring Content Partnerships team members.  In many organizations, these would be considered “sales” or “business development” roles*.  We are looking for people to evangelize our products to agencies and brands and build partnerships that are beneficial to not just the advertiser but to the user (most important) and Mozilla.  What counts?  Pro-activity.  Empathy and judgement for the user.  Understanding our values and not just bringing in a dollar where you can find it.  Creativity.  Accountability.  Sound interesting?  We have a more robust job-spec ready for those who are interested.  Contact here.

Partnership Success Team
I’m not sold on the name of the team yet but we’re looking to build out our success function to our content partnerships.  These roles would generally be labeled as “Account Management” and such – making sure the campaigns and clients are having a successful experience working with Mozilla.  What counts?  Details.  Pro-activity.  Being able to think on your feet.  Resourceful.  Polished.  People-person.  Friendly.  Humorous.  Humble.  Sound interesting?  We have a more robust job-spec ready for those who are interested.  Contact here.

Ideally, you are based in New York, Chicago, Mountain View or San Francisco but willing to consider exquisite candidates in most locations.

 

 

* My friend Jon discusses the name change here.

 

2015 Technology, Advertising, and Digital Prediction List

Over the years, I have curated and posted an technology, marketing, advertising, and media trend prediction list on this blog.  This year is no different, I’m going to do it again.  This is a good list to bookmark and reference as you create your presentations throughout the year.

I’ll keep this updated – but I’m not perfect.  Email me if you would like me to include your list (send me blog link and #1 prediction) here.

Predictions for 2015: Uber, Beacons, AdTech, and More (John Battelle)
Thinking about 2015:  Payments, Content Creation, and more
(Darren Herman)
What’s Going to Happen (Fred Wilson)
My 5 Predictions for 2015 and Beyond (Don Dodge)
Mobile Tech Predictions: Android, Amazon, Windows, etc (ZDNet/@jkendrick)
Three Seismic Threats to Marketers (AdAge/@dberkowitz)
The State of Bitcoin and Crytpocurrencies (A16z/@pmarca)
Eight Seismic Changes to the Hispanic Market (MediaPost/Jose Villa)World Economic Forum Predictions: Digital (WEF/Sven Denecken)
What’s Next in Wireless (John Legere)
Tech Predictions:  What Does the Future Hold? (Gary Newe)
20 Questions for 2015 (Benedict Evans)
20 E-Commerce Trends and Predictions for 2015 (eConsultancy)
Predictions for Digital Marketing in 2015 (Adobe/John Watton)
The Future of Digital Media in 2015 (TechCrunch/@pcsathy)
4 Cloud Predictions for 2015 (GigaOm/Barb Darrow)
API Predictions (Steven Willmott)
Predictions for 2015:  There Will be Blood (Valleywag/Dan Lyons)
2015 Tech Predictions (Hany Rashwan)
10 Predictions for Content Marketing (Mashable/Shafqat Islam)
What To Look Out for in Tech 2015 (BI Intelligence)

 

Some big hairy questions for advertising and marketing technology

It’s an exciting time for the advertising and marketing technology world.  WPP recently acquired up to 25% of Appnexus, Millennial Media just acquired Nexage, and Mozilla recently announced it was entering the advertising landscape (self promotion, I know).

I’ve participated in this ecosystem for a while now and have some big hairy questions for us all going forward.  I think we should spend some time trying to think these questions through as an industry because we are all going to face it them.

What happens when we have five closed ecosystems?

You know, Google, Amazon, Apple, Baidu and Facebook.  These companies are large enough to become “first party” and could redefine the advertising landscape.  What happens to everyone else?  How is measurement accomplished for agencies and advertisers when 3rd party isn’t allowed?

Advertising buyers haven’t thought of the browser much, but they will play an increasingly important role

Back on the agency side, I didn’t see many line items on our media plans specifically for Safari, Internet Explorer, Chrome, Opera or Firefox but these might play a role moving forward.  Default blocking of cookies, add-ons like AdBlock Plus, and others are impacting ad delivery and targeting.

At large, users are just not in control of their advertising experiences

I spend a lot of time meeting with advertising and marketing technology companies in our sector and I just don’t see the inclusion of user permission/control within the innovation.  Imagine what the results would be if users actually were part of the process around making available the data they wanted marketers to react to.

The display category is much bigger than it was 4 years ago but are we setup to measure it?

Every couple of months a new ad unit is released and every few years, a new medium is created.  Display media has evolved across mediums and units and is at an all-time high; and tomorrow, it’ll be even higher.  Using some quick examples, we have display on Twitter, Pinterest, Firefox, Instagram, Snapchat, and Flipboard… all of which units didn’t exist 1,000 days ago.

We are entering a new wave of marketing and we’re buying the wrong metric

Reach and frequency are the wrong metrics for moving forward but they were the right metrics for yesterdays media buying.  I believe we’re entering the Intention Economy (stolen from Doc Searls) where “intention holders” will be able to make spot markets and evolve the advertising equation.  Why not?  Why not.  Technology has evolved and we’re starting to see the early infrastructure of this existing across Facebook and Uber.

Agencies will exist, they are just setup wrong for the future

One of the more popular questions that gets asked is whether or not agencies will exist in the future… and I certainly believe they will.  Relationships are super important and managed service is not going away.  However, agencies will change and morph.  If we move into the “intention economy” and we have “intention holders,” who becomes the agency for the user?  Who is the user agency?

These are just some of the questions that I’m thinking about – and are part of my industry breakfast conversations.   I hope you are thinking about them too as they are going to impact the next five to ten years of our industry.

Attention Minutes

Earlier this morning, one of my colleagues sent around a note to a bunch of us pointing to a post by Matt Mullenweg, founder of WordPress (and many others).  In his post, he talks how the Knight Foundation has granted Grist.org monies to build an open-source WordPress plug-in to measure Attention Minutes.

As someone who straddles technology and marketing/advertising, I wanted to talk about why this is particularly interesting.

Note however, WordPress is not the first to go down this path, mentioned in the comments of the post are Upworthy and Parse.ly, two companies who are dabbling in this space too.  I’m sure there are many others.

Lets break down Attention & Minutes.

at·ten·tion (noun)

The dictionary describes attention as the act or faculty of attending, especially by directing the mind to an object.  Since the invention of Internet marketing, attention has been one of the key drivers of increased economic growth…. because it’s measurable.  If you can measure attention by different proxies, you can understand if it’s working or not for you or your brand and can then make rationale decisions as to investing more or less.

Attention KPIs focus around engagement.   CTR is a signal of attention.  Hovers/Mouse overs are a signal of attention.  Purchase is a signal of attention.  Commenting is a signal of attention.  Creating is a signal of attention.  You get the idea.

min·ute (noun)

The dictionary defines a minute as the sixtieth part (1/60) of an hour; sixty Minutes are super important in advertising because much of the ecosystem trades on time based measures such as Gross Rating Points (GRP).  The GRP delivers of the answer of what % of the population is reached during said time period, with some form of content… usually television.   There have been movements to bring the GRP to digital media and I’ve certainly been vocal about this subject in the past.

Attention Minutes

Attention Minutes are interesting to me.  I don’t immediately dismiss them like I do with GRP’s.  I like the idea of a measurable attribute/KPI with some form of time period.  This seems reasonable and something that I’d like to learn more about.  How is it bought?  How is it sold?  What tools measure it?  How can you purchase attention minutes in the programmatic world?

One of my close friends and former boss used to tell the world he’d like to purchase Instantaneous Awareness for his brands.  Maybe we’re coming closer to that?

 

Google Controls 41.8% of total Internet Ad Spend

I was doing some financial modeling for a new initiative we’re thinking about at work and wanted to see how many ad dollars there were per Internet user.  Based on my simple calculations, it’s on average* $40.88 per user, per year.

And ….by the way, Google controls around 41.8% of total Internet ad spending.  Wow.

Internet Ad Spending

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Note, I said average above.  We know that some markets value users higher than others.
** Link to the Google doc with above information is here

VRM, The Intention Economy, and The Thank You Economy

It’s not uncommon for me to get the questions, what looks interesting to you these days? … or where are you focused?  Since joining Mozilla, I’ve filtered pretty much all of my knowledge and history with “user empowerment” and the area I keep coming back to is the quiet but growing VRM space.  For those unfamiliar with the term, it’s Vendor Relationship Management, the opposite and complimentary tool of CRM:  Customer Relationship Management.

PowertothePeople

The VRM conversation is being championed by Doc Searls of Harvard Berkman Center but at this point, the ecosystem is growing larger than the one individual.  You might recognize Doc’s name as he was one of the authors of the book, Cluetrain Manifesto and followed it up with The Intention Economy.

In the beginning of The Intention Economy, Doc posits that soon, customers will be able to:

  • Control the flow and use of personal data
  • Build their own loyalty programs
  • Dictate their own terms of service
  • Tell whole markets what they want, how they want it, where and when they should be able to get it, and how much it should cost

When you think about these four points, they empower the customer/user and play nicely into the idea of VRM.   Joe Mandese, a VRM list subscriber and all around amazing MediaPost Editor-in-Chief wrote a piece recently titled:  Acronymity:  The Three Most Important Letters You’ve Never Heard Of.  In this piece, Mandese writes about the shift from brands at center to users at center of the value equation.

Per the above points and Mandese’s piece, you’ll start to see some consistency around empowering the user.

On Madison Avenue, there is a lot of talk about empowering the user but the funny thing is, it’s done completely opaque, without user permission (or with permission under a ton of legalese), and the user has been given no access to their data…. among many other things.

Social media has pushed us a little closer to a world of VRM….incrementally- but at least in the right direction.  In social channels, users have a voice – one that can be exponentially radiated.   If I have a bad experience on Delta, a simple 140 character tweet can help solve the problem where not-so-long-ago, it took a penned letter and weeks of waiting to hear back from them.

In The Thank You Economy, Gary Vaynerchuck writes, now customers’ demands for authenticity, originality, creativity, honesty, and good intent have made it necessary for companies and brands to revert to a level of customer service rarely seen since our great-grandparents’ day, when business owners often knew their customers personally, and gave them individual attention.

Books

The power of social media (individual voices) and VRM (individuals being empowered, commercially or otherwise) will put us ahead in the next decade.  It’s a bigger opportunity than search (SEM*).  So, this is where I’m focused for now and hiring people and meeting people who want to experiment here.   If you do, please contact me.

* SEM:  probably one of the purest forms of intentcasting which plays into the VRM space but is not entirely the VRM space.

 

The Apprenticeship I Would Want

I received an email from an industry friend and fellow Silicon Alley Golf Invitational player who alerted me of the TubeMogul/IPG Apprenticeship program.  I’ve been living under a rock lately so I totally missed this when it first came out in early March but here is one of the pieces written up about the program.

I don’t have any more information than anyone else reading the websites but looks like you spend 6 months learning the ins/outs of TubeMogul and then the next 6 months learning the ins/outs of IPG, a very large and respected agency holding company with a nod towards advertising and media technologies.  I wonder if it’s paid?

This apprenticeship is fantastic.  Forget TubeMogul or IPG for a second.  Just think of spending 6 months at a leading video publisher and then 6 months on the agency side.  You will learn a lot.  This is the opportunity to get your footing in the right place, learn what you like/don’t like, and start to form an opinion in the ad tech industry.

So, if you’re not gainfully employed, graduating University or are looking to jump ship, you should check out this apprenticeship.  More here.

… and absolutely love the initial question re: LumaScape – place TubeMogul + IPG on the landscape.